ME/CFS and the pneumonia vaccination…

I’ve discussed before the dire side-effects of the flu vaccines in ME/CFS, but this is worse. If I didn’t know why I feel so ill I’d be seriously worried. Even so, I’m some worried…

Yesterday, at my annual COPD check-up, I was offered the pneumonia vaccine (why I haven’t been offered it before is a question for another day). Given the current flu slowdemic, next winter’s flu season is likely to be a doozy, and given my chances of surviving a normal flu season are no better than 50-50, after querying the nurse about side-effects in the light of my ME/CFS – no worse than the flu vaccine, I was assured Continue reading

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More thoughts on the flu pandemic…

Actually, when I typed that the first time it came out as Morte thoughts… How very apposite…

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The conduct of the government, the health service and pretty much anyone else involved with swine flu has been totally half-assed. Except maybe for GPs but, because the measures involved to support front-line doctors are more or less non-existent, they’re pretty much screwed anyway.

From the outset, I have questioned the  the sanity, when there are several cases in a school, of closing the school and turning the kids loose on the streets, in what they were calling the “swine skive” in London – Tamiflu notwithstanding.

Quite a few of those children subsequently Continue reading

Missing the point…

A designer, John Cornock, who seems seriously out of touch with reality, has designed a kitchen knife which, he says – and bafflingly, the Home Office are backing him in this assertion – has no point, so is safer than a knife with which one can stab. Which is the most unutterable bollocks. Any blade, pointed or not, can kill and maim – just ask a Rwandan about machetes.  Think, too, about a lino knife – you can’t stab anyone with one of them, either, but the hooked blade can be lethal.

Blowing up the photo until it matched my 8” chef’s knife, showed that the vestigial point is still capable of doing a substantial amount of damage, (while being useless in the kitchen), as, of course, is the edge. The inability to Continue reading

The curse of the wheelie bin…

Some whiny buggers are getting incensed because, with the increase in wheelie bins, they have to move as many as three bins. Numpty Guardian hack David Mitchell says they’re moaning bastards and should just leave them on the pavement. No, they bloody shouldn’t!

For a start, many areas stagger collections – different days, even different weeks. for normal refuse, recycling, and garden refuse bins (look, don’t bin your garden refuse, compost it; your garden will benefit) – so it’s not that big a problem. Wheelie bins left on the pavement, though, are a problem, and a huge one.

Their living permanently on the pavement is a massive nuisance, and a huge hazard for mothers with babies in buggies, the blind or visually impaired (they’re not the same thing, no matter what the PC brigade think), and my personal gripe Continue reading

Journalism, real life – and the gulf between…

Two articles in the Guardian’s Weekend magazine rather got up my nose yesterday, striking me as self-indulgent in the extreme – or just plain odd.

One was an apparently normal, attractive, woman, Hephzibah Anderson, who, after a relationship fizzled (ah, diddums; you’re not alone, babe, it happens to us all), had decided to give up sex, but not dating, for a year. That’s just perverse, and must have Continue reading

The scandal of the missing soy sauce…

Some time ago, Bovril mysteriously vanished from the shelves as has ordinary plum jam, though Bovril returned. Now, for some reason, Kikkoman Soy Sauce has bitten the dust too.

Kikkoman is arguably the best of the mass-market soy sauces (even sleb chefs on TV use the stuff – I think it goes beyond product placement, with so many using it), but can I buy it? Can I buggery.

Both Sainsbury’s and Tesco have dumped it in favour Continue reading

Microgreens again…

Once everything is settled here – it’s been a problematic year so far – I can settle down to the business of growing microgreens. The lack of success with my first try was, I believe, simply that I was trying too hard.

The shallow plastic trays that supermarket veg comes in – about 2 cms deep is ideal – are perfect, with a few drainage holes poked in the bottom using a hot nail or something similar (held with pliers, of course!), and filled with seedling compost rather than potting compost, which is too coarse. Vermiculite, which I tried, seems to be Continue reading

The cost of a conscience…

Harking back to the ethical debate, touched on in the previous Ron’s Kitchen post, today’s Observer magazine is dedicated to ecological issues, including an article about recycled household goods, which just reinforces what I said about a conscience needing money.

We have, in no particular order:- Continue reading